Dripping Reality Into Abstraction – Chantal Roy

Incorporating elements of nature into her art by delicately dripping them onto her canvas, Chantal Roy creates paintings full of life and energy.

chantal roy

Creating a beautiful blend between nature and abstraction, Chantal Roy has a truly unique style of painting.  “My eclectic style is drawn from my unquenchable thirst to create my own path and explore the unknown,” she says. Chantal incorporates elements from nature by delicately dripping them onto her canvas. The resulting dialogue between the fluidity of abstraction and beauty of realism is a painting full of life and spirit.

chantal roy
Chantal Roy working in her studio.

Roy believes in the therapeutic qualities of art and wants her viewers to benefit from those too. Her paintings, incorporating not only elements from nature but also recycled materials, advocate a deep appreciation for the environment. “It brings me closer to Mother Earth and speaks to Her struggle over how we treat Her.”

How did you eventually come to this style of painting, merging the boundaries between realism and abstraction? Or was it something you always did?

Elan vers L'inconnu
Elan vers L’inconnu

My artistic journey has been all about experimenting with different styles and techniques. A lack of professional training gives me the liberty to try such unconventional things with my media that other trained professionals would not even dare to. I am always left pleasantly surprised by what this experimentation results in. In my paintings, I incorporate elements of abstract painting along with realistic images. For instance, the image of an animal on a wild background creates the atmosphere of a forest and instantly transports the viewer inside the painting.

The way different colors come together in abstracts has always appealed to the artist in me. Although abstraction is still a little hazy to me and there is a chance I do not fully understand it, I love working with the possibilities it provides, adding a little twist of my own each time.

Do you incorporate the drips into the composition after or do you do the drips first and then work on the image?

I always do the background first, covering the canvas with carefully chosen colors. Following this, I add the drips to the painting along with the subject I have decided on for the work. The fluidity and the effect that the drips provide bring not only the subject but also the entire painting to life.

Get first and exclusive access to Agora Gallery’s news, exhibitions, and artists by signing up to our newsletter.

Could you tell us a little more about what these drips represent?

The drips on my canvas represent the past. Each one is like a souvenir from an experience in my life. They symbolize the journey of life for me.

How do you choose your subjects?

I never choose the subject right away, I choose the colors first. The chosen palette gives direction to my inspiration at that particular moment and eventually leads me to the subject. This result is the creation of a very intuitive and personal artwork, often inspired by my own experiences or the people and things that surround me. Often, I find myself going back and examining the painting once it’s completed to understand why I chose to paint what I did. The answers I find are more often than not, a revelation.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

There is a streak of symbolism throughout your paintings. Water, trees, and butterflies seem to find their way into your works quite frequently. What do they represent?

Water and trees are such an essential part of our survival. The branches of a tree symbolize all the paths in life one could follow. Just like every individual, each one of these paths is completely different. Hence, the tree becomes a symbol for possibilities and often finds its way into my creations.

I am also really drawn to the delicacy and fragility of a butterfly. Butterflies have a dramatically short life; perhaps, it’s the reason they are always seeking out beauty in all things – hidden in the flower beds, lost in the shadows of the forest or lurking in the blossoming garden. I believe they understand and appreciate nature so much more than we do.

You work in a retiree home. To an average person, it’s a place of melancholy and pensiveness that tends to weigh heavily on one’s soul. Do you draw inspiration from the wisdom of long-lived years around you?

My passion for painting is a way to disconnect myself from the suffering I see every day. Painting helps me appreciate and embrace the beauty of life in its transience. The wise and experienced souls that I encounter during my visits, also inspire me to do the same. They have helped me to become a better person and to enjoy every passing minute like it was the last.

What do you want to convey to your audience?

I want my audience to know that painting has always been a huge part of my life. I have always needed colors to express myself fully and to transmit my inner self to the audience. My artistic practice has made me realize that knowing the answers or following the rules is never necessary. I want to convey this to my audience too.

My ultimate goal is to create art that is full of life and positive energies.

 

Collectors often relate to the art they buy emotionally, and more often than not, it is because they identify with the artist’s process. Whether you are looking to decorate an entire home, complete a room, or add vitality and professional credibility to an office space you will find the perfect piece on ARTmine. Need help in finding the perfect piece that really speaks to you? Contact us at sales@agora-gallery.com

Chantal Roy’s work are on view at the Agora Gallery until November 30th as part of the Divergent Realities exhibition. You can also view more of her works on her ARTmine page or read more about her practice on her artist profile.

Leave a Reply